Pomegranate Miang with ginger, chilli, lime, peanuts & toasted coconut

Photography by Zeren Wilson, @bittenwritten

Photography by Zeren Wilson, @bittenwritten

Wow, even looking at my own words feels like a blast from the past these days, it seems I have truly mastered the art of consistently inconsistently writing- absolutely nailed it!

Now I’ve had bloody busy year, however I still can’t really Justify not putting up a post for nearly a year and a half, that’s mental. So I’ll attempt to give you guys an overview of my year in a nutshell, I will also try my utmost hardest to finish this post before I’m 40 and before you guys are bored to death of my bad English, typo’s and made up words.

Right so where was I when I last shared a recipe? Bloody hell I think it was the begging bowl, seems like a lifetime ago now. I’ve since moved on to launch a Thai barbecue restaurant on Denmark Street in soho, called the smoking goat. My head chef position here was a fun experience and really pushed my chef ability above and beyond. I’ve worked with some amazing people during my time smoking goats. We successfully managed to combine a style of cooking which, I believe, is relatively saturated in London, ‘barbecue’, with a cuisine which, for me, is just birthing and shaping itself as something truly respected and delicious when it is made with love, ‘Thai food’. I’m proud of what I managed to achieve at the smoking goat, with consistent great reviews and queue’s outside the door I don’t feel there is much to complain about.

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/jan/02/smoking-goat-old-tom-english-restaurant-review

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/features/the-smoking-goat-restaurant-review-9858355.html

http://www.standard.co.uk/goingout/restaurants/fay-maschler-reviews-smoking-goat-9840423.html

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/event/article-2921762/Tom-Parker-Bowles-reviews-Smoking-Goat-London.html

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/magazine/article4342089.ece

me and the EatGrub lads have also been pretty busy over the last year writing our cookbook, which is now finished and out next year. Shami and Neil are still smashing it at Grub and the company is on to wonderful things. I’m still loving working with them although I may have driven them mad trying to write a cookbook at the same time as running the smoking goat (not to mention I must have drove the lads crazy at work having to put up with a mental head chef leaving insects around the office). I can tell you now as a true fact that it is not easy to write a cookbook, and run a busy kitchen at the same time. It’s incredibly satisfying to have completed the book, I’m also happy to be done with the sleepless nights cooking insects and writing recipes to the early morning (everyone knows what I mean, right?).

This now brings me on to the most recent chapter of my journey. I’ve now moved on from the smoking goat to begin my journey on my own. I’ve worked incredibly hard in this industry and have a lot of great people on my side so I’ve decided to continue in the food industry the way I want. Pestle London is currently a pop up restaurant with a key focus on making banging Thai curries and small plates, all from scratch- no peanut butter! We open on Wednesday 30th September, 19:00-22:00, Wednesday to Friday nights at sacred cafe next to Holloway Road station. It’s going to be a cool relaxed vibe, good music, good drink, and absolutely shit food (joking! I’ll try my hardest).

Right- that’s enough of my crap for at least one more year, let’s get you guys cooking. Today’s recipe is one from my menu at the moment and it’s been a hit with the customers. Miang with a sweet, salty, sour and fresh heat is the perfect accompiniment to a dinner of curry and noodles. It’s a great one for at home as you can make a mix up and then all help yourselves, easy to share and delicious. Be carful though, one of the little basterds always ends up with all the birds eye chilli in it.

This recipe makes enough for 4-5 people to snack on, if any is left just wack it in the fridge, it’ll keep for 2-3 days as long as it’s covered. You can find all of these ingredients in any good Asian supermarket, I prefer new loon moon in Chinatown for fresh goods as they have a large range of fresh goods in comparison to other shops.

ingredients

(for the miang sauce)

-150ml, tamarind water

-500g, palm sugar

-150g, fish sauce/ soy sauce if you are vegetarian

-100g, toasted peanuts, semi-pounded in a pestle and mortar

-100g, toasted dessicated coconut

-1 tablespoon dried shrimp, pounded to a floss in a pestle and mortar /don’t include if making vegetarian

-2, green birds eye chilli

-1 teaspoon, fermented shrimp paste ‘gapi’

(for the rest)

-1cm cubed, piece of ginger, peeled and diced

-6 Thai shallots, peeled and diced

-1/2 a whole lime, diced with the skin on

-2 tablespoon, toasted coconut

-3 tablespoon, semi-pounded peanuts

-2 red birds eye chillies, thinly sliced

-a small handful of coriander leaves, washed

-1 pomegranate, de-seeded and all pith removed.

-20 betel leaves/ if you can’t find any then you can use baby gem, or spinach leaves, washed

method

1.firstly make the miang sauce. In a pan heat the palm sugar, and fish/soy sauce, and the gapi paste on a medium heat, stirring regularly and making sure it doesn’t stick to the sides.

2. In the meantime, using a pestle and mortar pound the 2 green birds eye chillies. Then one by one add the rest of the dried ingredients so that they all end up making one dry mix that includes the coconut, peanut, dried shrimp and chilli. Keep heating the palm sugar and fish sauce until all sugar has melted and the sauce has just started bubbling, then add the tamarind water and temporarily remove from heat.

3. Next add the pounded dry mix that you have pre-prepared to the sauce and whisk, ensuring that you separate any clumps of dried ingredients. This makes sure that the ingredients are well distributed and helps to balance flavours.

4. Lastly add all the fresh ingredient to this sauce except for the betel leaves, mix delicately, being sure not to damage any of the ingredients that you’re mixing. Once everything is evenly distributed place a spoonful of this mixture into the middle of the betel leaves and arrange neatly on a plate. Then eat them up!

So there you have it, pomegranate miang to make at home, I hope you enjoy the recipe

Thanks very much for stopping by at ‘Articuleat’ and I hope you have enjoyed your stay. I always look forward to your feedback so please don’t hesitate to get in touch for any reason whatsoever – I will reply as swiftly as possible.

See you next time,

Eat Well,

Sebbyholmes

seb

Advertisements

Sticky & Rich Kecap Manis Barbeque Hunters Chicken with Herb Spiced Chestnut Mushrooms

Sticky & Rich Kecap Manis Barbeque Hunters Chicken with Herb Spiced Chestnut Mushrooms

Barbecue is one of the most commonly eaten sauces on the planet! This is in no way true but hopefully it got your attention. Since my childhood I have always had an insatiable thirst for barbecue sauce; so I figured it’s time for it’s debut appearance within Articuleat’ s early posts, so this one’s  for those of you that share my love for this fabulous condiment.

There are as many ways to make barbecue sauce as there are recipes to cook using it, however after much (and much, much more) experimentation this is my favourite so far. I found that lots of people use tomato ketchup as a base for there sauce to give it the correct flavour balance and consistency. However, here at Articuleat that just won’t do – I created this recipe using Indonesian sweet soy sauce (known as kecap manis) as the base for my sauce. Kecap manis can be found in any oriental supermarket and most large supermarkets.

For this recipe I have kept the barbeque sauce mild to not add any extra spice to the chestnut mushrooms. If you are into your heat however, do not be afraid to add a little chilli powder, or extra peppercorns to my recipe. The key to this sauce is in the balance; sweet, salty, sour and hot all play elements in making this sauce one to write home about.

The sticky and rich consistency is a perfect partner to some chestnut mushrooms lightly fried in herb oil. Despite this the BBQ season is upon us so why listen to me – why not marinate some meat in this sauce and throw it on the barbeque?

(serves 2, takes 1 hour)

Ingredients

(for the barbeque sauce)

-100ml, kecap manis, sweet soy (can be found in any oriental supermarket and most large supermarkets)

-20ml, balsamic vinegar

-20ml, Worcestershire sauce

-60ml, light chicken stock

-1tsp, cumin seeds

1tsp, pink peppercorns

-1tsp, Chinese five spice

-1tsp, fennel seeds

-2 heaped tbsp, palm sugar, crushed (soft brown sugar will do)

-1 white onion, finely chopped

-2 garlic cloves, finely chopped or crushed

-1 whole red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped

(for the herb spiced mushrooms)

-2, whole chicken breasts, boneless

-100g, chestnut mushrooms, washed and sliced

-1 handful (roughly 70g), parsley, finely chopped

-100ml, olive oil

-1 whole red chilli, finely sliced

-1 garlic clove, finely chopped

Method

  1. Firstly pre-heat your oven to 180 degrees. Whilst that heats lets get the barbeque sauce ready – begin by toasting the pink peppercorns, cumin and fennel seeds together in a dry pan. Keep these moving in a hot pan until you see a little smoke, then remove from the hot pan and spice grind to one powder (or use a pestle and mortar).
  2. Next fry the garlic, onion and red chilli in a pan with a little oil until golden brown and crispy (not burned or it will taste bitter). Once ready add the kecap manis, light chicken stock, Worcestershire sauce, balsamic vinegar and palm sugar (soft brown sugar) and bring to a simmer. Once simmering add the spice grinded dried spices along with the Chinese five spice and whisk to combine, simmer to infuse for 2-3 minutes then remove and cool. Finish the sauce by combining to one smooth mixture in a food processor (should be a dark, smooth, rich pourable consistency)
  3. Now that the magic is ready get the hunters chicken in the oven. Using tin foil, individually coat each chicken breast in barbeque sauce and wrap tightly within the foil (if you have time marinate the meat in the fridge for a few hours, or ideally overnight), then place on a tray and put on the top shelf of the oven for 20-25 minutes. Ensure that chicken is piping hot throughout before serving, to check poke the end of a spoon into the middle and leave for a few seconds, remove and place the spoon on your lip – if it hurts it’s ready (obviously be carful).
  4. Lastly let’s make the herb spiced mushrooms. Bring a little pan of water to the boil and drop in the chopped parsley for 20 seconds, remove and refresh under cold water. Dry using a tea towel then combine the oil, parsley, garlic and chilli in a food processor until mixture is combined (should be bright green). Once combined heat this herb oil on a medium heat until hot, then add the chestnut mushrooms making sure to coat all of them in the hot oil. Stir these regularly for 6-8 minutes until softened
    and cooked.
  5. Serve the hunters chicken upon the chestnut mushrooms and garnish with a little parsley if you’re looking to impress.

Sticky & Rich Kecap Manis Barbeque Hunters Chicken with Herb Spiced Chestnut MushroomsThanks very much for stopping by at Articuleat and I hope you have enjoyed your stay. I always look forward to your feedback so please don’t hesitate to get in touch for any reason whatsoever – I will reply as swiftly as possible.

See you next time,

Eat Well,

Sebbyholmes