Smoked Chicken, Wild Mushrooms, Sweet Basil, Coconut & Galangal Soup

Poached chicken, coconut & galingal soup (photo by Kaleem Hyder)

Photo from Farang by Kaleem Hyder

I have just spent the weekend in sunny Birmingham at the BBC Good Food Show cooking with the Thai Embassy on the Thai World Stage to help promote Thai produce and cuisine. I’ve never been to Birmingham before, although I have to say it felt like more like Kingston, Jamaica at 34 degrees- it’s been an absolute scorcher!

The show was a good crack actually, apart from it taking place at the NEC in Birmingham which has to be one of the most boring places on the planet- it reminded me of the film ‘The Truman Show’, where you feel you will walk through a door and hit a cardboard cut out of another door if you’re not careful. All the same the show was great and I’ve come back excited to get another recipe up on ‘Articuleat‘.

In this heat I wanted to cook something quick, effortless, light and tasty as fuck so I went for this soup. This soup can be made in many different variations, a few of which can be found in my book ‘Cook Thai‘ if you ever feel like giving them a go. It only takes a few bits and pieces and around 10-15 minutes to make and all of the ingredients can be found easily in most supermarkets these days. If you’re feeling really exotic throw in some king prawns to this soup too- awesome!

Ingredients Serves 2 / Vegetarian option

1 chicken breast, skin and fat removed, sliced into rough 2cm by 2cm pieces, directions for smoking in recipe  (do not use if vegetarian, ha)

1/4 butternut squash, roughly 50g, peeled and sliced into rough 2cm by 2 cm pieces (pumpkin can be used instead)

8 Thai Shallots, peeled and slightly bruised in a pestle

2 green birds eye chillies, bruised in a pestle

2 kaffir lime leaves, torn slightly

2 sticks lemongrass, chopped into 2 cm long pieces and bruised in a pestle

10g, galangal, peeled and chopped into 2 cm long pieces and bruised in a pestle

2 coriander roots, cleaned, washed and bruised in a pestle

½ teaspoon coarse sea salt

2-3 tablespoons fish sauce (soy sauce if vegetarian)

200ml chicken stock (vegetable stock if vegetarian)

300ml coconut cream

10g, Thai sweet basil (normal basil will do)

50g, assorted wild mushrooms (I use enoki, shittaki and emoji mushrooms)

1 lime, juiced

Method

Before I get started with the recipe I’ll delve a little into explaining how to smoke the chicken. In this recipe I cold smoke my chicken which can be done very easily when you’re at home. This means that I will be adding the smoke flavour from the wood to the meat, without cooking it. All you need is some smoking wood chips, a pan, a colander and some cling film. Place a small handful of wood chips into the pan and heat the pan up until the wood chips set alight within the pan. Once this happens put the flames out with a little water, this will cause the chips to smoke heavily. at this stage place the chicken in the colander and then put the colander upon the smoking pan, then quickly cling film the whole thing so it is air tight with no smoke leaving the cling film. This will leave the chicken inside a smoke vacuum, with minimal oxygen so the wood chips will not be hot but will smoke a lot. If this is left untouched for 20 minutes the smokey flavour would have penetrated the meat, the longer you leave it the smokier the flavour.

Firstly, in a small sauce pan bring a little water to the boil and then submerge the squash into it, then turn down to a simmer, continue to gently cook for around 3-4 minutes until soft but not quite cooked and then remove from the heat and put aside for a few minutes (at this stage you might as well leave it in the hot water as we are to use it straight away).

Next place the chicken stock, 100ml of the coconut cream, 2 tablespoons fish sauce, sea salt, galangal, coriander roots, birds eye chillies, lemongrass, lime leaves, butternut squash and Thai shallots and mushrooms into a medium sauce pan and bring to a simmer. Once simmering add the chicken pieces and continue to cook gently for 4-5 minutes until all chicken is cooked and all vegetables have softened with flavours infused.

Finish by adding the rest of the coconut cream and the sweet basil and the dishing out into bowls. Lastly check the seasoning, it should be creamy, salty, a little spicy, aromatic with a fresh hint of lime at the end, adjust if needs be.

Thanks very much for stopping by at ‘Articuleat’ and I hope you have enjoyed your stay. I always look forward to your feedback so please don’t hesitate to get in touch for any reason whatsoever – I will reply as swiftly as possible.

 

See you next time,

Eat Well,

Sebbyholmes

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Pomegranate Miang with ginger, chilli, lime, peanuts & toasted coconut

Photography by Zeren Wilson, @bittenwritten

Photography by Zeren Wilson, @bittenwritten

Wow, even looking at my own words feels like a blast from the past these days, it seems I have truly mastered the art of consistently inconsistently writing- absolutely nailed it!

Now I’ve had bloody busy year, however I still can’t really Justify not putting up a post for nearly a year and a half, that’s mental. So I’ll attempt to give you guys an overview of my year in a nutshell, I will also try my utmost hardest to finish this post before I’m 40 and before you guys are bored to death of my bad English, typo’s and made up words.

Right so where was I when I last shared a recipe? Bloody hell I think it was the begging bowl, seems like a lifetime ago now. I’ve since moved on to launch a Thai barbecue restaurant on Denmark Street in soho, called the smoking goat. My head chef position here was a fun experience and really pushed my chef ability above and beyond. I’ve worked with some amazing people during my time smoking goats. We successfully managed to combine a style of cooking which, I believe, is relatively saturated in London, ‘barbecue’, with a cuisine which, for me, is just birthing and shaping itself as something truly respected and delicious when it is made with love, ‘Thai food’. I’m proud of what I managed to achieve at the smoking goat, with consistent great reviews and queue’s outside the door I don’t feel there is much to complain about.

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/jan/02/smoking-goat-old-tom-english-restaurant-review

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/features/the-smoking-goat-restaurant-review-9858355.html

http://www.standard.co.uk/goingout/restaurants/fay-maschler-reviews-smoking-goat-9840423.html

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/event/article-2921762/Tom-Parker-Bowles-reviews-Smoking-Goat-London.html

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/magazine/article4342089.ece

me and the EatGrub lads have also been pretty busy over the last year writing our cookbook, which is now finished and out next year. Shami and Neil are still smashing it at Grub and the company is on to wonderful things. I’m still loving working with them although I may have driven them mad trying to write a cookbook at the same time as running the smoking goat (not to mention I must have drove the lads crazy at work having to put up with a mental head chef leaving insects around the office). I can tell you now as a true fact that it is not easy to write a cookbook, and run a busy kitchen at the same time. It’s incredibly satisfying to have completed the book, I’m also happy to be done with the sleepless nights cooking insects and writing recipes to the early morning (everyone knows what I mean, right?).

This now brings me on to the most recent chapter of my journey. I’ve now moved on from the smoking goat to begin my journey on my own. I’ve worked incredibly hard in this industry and have a lot of great people on my side so I’ve decided to continue in the food industry the way I want. Pestle London is currently a pop up restaurant with a key focus on making banging Thai curries and small plates, all from scratch- no peanut butter! We open on Wednesday 30th September, 19:00-22:00, Wednesday to Friday nights at sacred cafe next to Holloway Road station. It’s going to be a cool relaxed vibe, good music, good drink, and absolutely shit food (joking! I’ll try my hardest).

Right- that’s enough of my crap for at least one more year, let’s get you guys cooking. Today’s recipe is one from my menu at the moment and it’s been a hit with the customers. Miang with a sweet, salty, sour and fresh heat is the perfect accompiniment to a dinner of curry and noodles. It’s a great one for at home as you can make a mix up and then all help yourselves, easy to share and delicious. Be carful though, one of the little basterds always ends up with all the birds eye chilli in it.

This recipe makes enough for 4-5 people to snack on, if any is left just wack it in the fridge, it’ll keep for 2-3 days as long as it’s covered. You can find all of these ingredients in any good Asian supermarket, I prefer new loon moon in Chinatown for fresh goods as they have a large range of fresh goods in comparison to other shops.

ingredients

(for the miang sauce)

-150ml, tamarind water

-500g, palm sugar

-150g, fish sauce/ soy sauce if you are vegetarian

-100g, toasted peanuts, semi-pounded in a pestle and mortar

-100g, toasted dessicated coconut

-1 tablespoon dried shrimp, pounded to a floss in a pestle and mortar /don’t include if making vegetarian

-2, green birds eye chilli

-1 teaspoon, fermented shrimp paste ‘gapi’

(for the rest)

-1cm cubed, piece of ginger, peeled and diced

-6 Thai shallots, peeled and diced

-1/2 a whole lime, diced with the skin on

-2 tablespoon, toasted coconut

-3 tablespoon, semi-pounded peanuts

-2 red birds eye chillies, thinly sliced

-a small handful of coriander leaves, washed

-1 pomegranate, de-seeded and all pith removed.

-20 betel leaves/ if you can’t find any then you can use baby gem, or spinach leaves, washed

method

1.firstly make the miang sauce. In a pan heat the palm sugar, and fish/soy sauce, and the gapi paste on a medium heat, stirring regularly and making sure it doesn’t stick to the sides.

2. In the meantime, using a pestle and mortar pound the 2 green birds eye chillies. Then one by one add the rest of the dried ingredients so that they all end up making one dry mix that includes the coconut, peanut, dried shrimp and chilli. Keep heating the palm sugar and fish sauce until all sugar has melted and the sauce has just started bubbling, then add the tamarind water and temporarily remove from heat.

3. Next add the pounded dry mix that you have pre-prepared to the sauce and whisk, ensuring that you separate any clumps of dried ingredients. This makes sure that the ingredients are well distributed and helps to balance flavours.

4. Lastly add all the fresh ingredient to this sauce except for the betel leaves, mix delicately, being sure not to damage any of the ingredients that you’re mixing. Once everything is evenly distributed place a spoonful of this mixture into the middle of the betel leaves and arrange neatly on a plate. Then eat them up!

So there you have it, pomegranate miang to make at home, I hope you enjoy the recipe

Thanks very much for stopping by at ‘Articuleat’ and I hope you have enjoyed your stay. I always look forward to your feedback so please don’t hesitate to get in touch for any reason whatsoever – I will reply as swiftly as possible.

See you next time,

Eat Well,

Sebbyholmes

seb

Lightly Spiced Tiger Prawn, Sweet Potato, Daikon & Thai Basil Fritter, Served With a Green Nham Jim Dipping Sauce

Lightly Spiced Tiger Prawn, Sweet Potato, Daikon & Thai Basil Fritter, Served With a Green Nham Jim Dipping SauceFinally I’m back behind the keyboard, I have an increasingly large list of events, recipes, anecdotes and articles in the back burner for ‘Articuleat’, (I just need to find the damn time to write them up).

The London pop-up scene has swallowed me up whole at the minute, in a big pile of edible insects and Thai food. Its amazing fun! Not to mention that the Begging Bowl is busier than ever. Thai food in London is booming and why not? It’s awesome! I feel privileged to be part of it.

I will soon be updating you all with what I’ve been up to in my ‘behind the whites section’. I’ve just finished another pop-up with EatGrub at the ‘Hot House Rooftop‘ in London Fields. I’m also going to be helping Andy Oliver at his next pop-up with ‘Som Saa’, at the chilli festival ‘chilli chilli bang bang’ in Dalston Yard – all exciting stuff.

Now anyway I’m getting ahead of myself again. This recipe for you today is a fairly quick one to put together (once you have dried your own turmeric and ginger). It’s the perfect accompaniment to a hot summer’s day, which we all know should be enjoyed with a nice cold pint in one hand and a fork in the other (not that I’ve got out of the shade of the extraction fans much recently).

When I make this dish I like to make my own mild curry powder to add to my egg batter before frying. Fresh turmeric, like ginger, is a rhizome – a thick underground stem. Due to this it take a lengthy, but simple process to dry it out and grind to a powder. Both fresh spices can be dried in the same way – peel, thinly slice and dry in a warm dry place, on a drying rack for at least 24 hours (May need longer dependent on environment). You can buy pre-dried turmeric and ginger but it’s in no way as good, or even similar to the real thing, try making it you’ll love it (why not make loads and leave it in the kitchen for another day?). However, when working with red turmeric be carful, the stuff stains your bloody hands orange for days. The last thing you want is everyone thinking that you look like an ‘umpa lumpa’ from the neck down!

I also think it’s important for me to talk you through making your own chilli powder. At the begging bowl we always use dried chillies and call it ‘blue tongue’? Now that I think of it, I actually have no bloody idea why or where that came from? I’m assuming it’s something to do with the fact that it’s fucking hot and it will certainly leave you with a burning mouth if you’re not careful. Now I’m lucky when making this as for best results it should be made in a wok (which I have at work), with a wok burner (very high heat). The intense temperature of the wok smokes the chillies whilst crisping them, making them easy to spice grind into a smoky, hot powder. I appreciate that unless you are some kind of maniac, you probably don’t have a wok burner to hand at home? I have found the best way to do it at home is in a dry pan on a high heat on the stove top, keep the chillies moving until they start smoking, then cover with tin foil and place in a hot oven for 2-3 minutes allowing to smoke a little. Carful- if you breathe in the smoke, you will cough. I also like to use 50/50 dried birds eye chillies to dried long red chillies, this gives the chilli powder a fiery hot, smokey and sweet flavour. It’s great when added to the curry powder.

When grating the vegetables to make this fritter (the daikon and sweet potato), it’s important to julienne them evenly to ensure it all cooks at a similar rate when being deep-fried. If your knife skills are still in practice, I suggest using a papaya shredder, or something of similar function. For anyone that is unsure what a Daikon is, it’s a type of radish. It’s also known as ‘mooli’ or Oriental radish and is much larger than a normal radish, they can be found in most good Asian supermarkets with a fresh vegetable section. If grating daikon (which we are) it’s important to use it as quickly as possible to retain the crisp, crunchy freshness.

The natural sweetness of tiger prawns are a great accompaniment to this lightly curried fritter. Once our home-made curry powder is completed, the vegetables, prawns and Thai Basil are tossed through a light egg batter and deep-fried to make the fritters. This is then served with a sweet, sour and fiery hot Nham jim dipping sauce- delicious.

This recipe was adapted from something I was shown from Andy Oliver, it is in no way the same (or as good) but feel I should credit him anyway – cheers Bandy Boliver.

I think that’s enough from me for one day and I’m sure you guys want to get cooking so I’ll leave you to it.

 

Enough to satisfy two people with a light lunch:

Ingredients (leaves loads spare to use another time, scale down if you want)

(For the curry powder)

-1tbspn, black peppercorns

-3tbspn, coriander seeds

-3tbspn, cumin seeds

-1tbspn cloves

-1tbspn fennel seeds

-15, Thai cardamom pods

-15, pik kwan, stems removed

-3tbspn home made chilli powder (1tbspn dried birds eye chillies, 1tbspn dried long red chillies, follow instructions above)

-5tbspns, ground, home-made dried ginger (follow instructions above for drying)

-7tbspns, ground, home-made dried turmeric (follow instructions above for drying)

(For the Nham jim dipping sauce)

-7, peeled garlic cloves

-5, green birds eye chillies, roughly chopped

-2tbspn, coriander root, finely chopped

-3tbspn, caster sugar (might need more to taste)

-300ml, fresh lime juice (might need more/or less to taste

-150ml, fish sauce, I like the mega chef brand best (might need more/or less to taste)

-2, mandarins, juiced

(For everything else)

-6 whole tiger prawns, body shells and shit removed, tails and head still attached

-1, sweet potato, julienned or shredded

-200g, daikon, julienned or shredded

-20g Thai Basil, picked

-10g, white sesame seeds

-2, free-range eggs

-100ml sparkling water

-1tbspn, rice flour

-1pinch Malden sea salt

-2 litres, cooking oil (for deep-frying)

Method

  1. Ok so firstly let’s get the spices toasted and the curry powder made. Have all you spices separated to start, as they need to be added to the pan at different times. The ginger, turmeric and chilli powder is already good to go if you followed my instructions in the writing above. In a large flat pan toast the spices on a low heat. When toasting spices you should always heat them in terms of their size, larger spices first and for longer ( as a larger object takes longer to toast). Once a spice begins to change colour and release a fragrant smell it is ready to use. The only spices that should not be toasted according to size are peppercorns as they pop and explode, just add them at the end and let the other spices warm them through. One toasted, add the ginger, turmeric and chilli powder then spice grind together to make the curry powder.
  1. Next make the fritter, heat the oil in a deep pan to 180 degrees. In a mixing bowl whisk together   1tbspn of the home-made curry powder, 1tbspn of rice flour, 1 pinch of Malden sea salt, the sparkling water and the eggs, beat to a pale mixture then rest in the fridge for a few minutes. In another mixing bowl, combine the prawns, shredded sweet potato, daikon, sesame seeds and the Thai basil. Pour the batter over all of this then mix with your hands until everything is covered in the egg mixture.
  2. Now the fritters are ready to be cooked. However if you throw the mixture in as is, it will break up and not cook together. Use a kitchen spider (large spoon with holes it it) to gently lower handfuls of the fritter mixture into the oil, making sure that the vegetables have cooked together, holding the fritters in one piece. Cook batches of the mixture one at a time for around 2-3 minutes in the oil, moving regularly to ensure an even cook. When ready remove from oil and leave to drain on kitchen roll.
  3. Meanwhile make your Nham jim dipping sauce, fresh is always best with a lime juice based product. In a pestle and mortar, pestle the coriander root, garlic then chillies in this order to a coarse paste, using sea salt as an abrasive if necessary. Next add the caster sugar and pound for a few seconds using the sugar as a second abrasive. Lastly add the lime, mandarin juice and fish sauce to make the dipping sauce. It should taste sweet, salty, sour and hot, adjust seasoning accordingly. An exact recipe is impossible as ingredients strengths change constantly.
  4. Serve the fritters garnished with some fresh Thai Basil leaves and enjoy.

Lightly Spiced Tiger Prawn, Sweet Potato, Daikon & Thai Basil Fritter, Served With a Green Nham Jim Dipping SauceThanks very much for stopping by at ‘Articuleat’ and I hope you have enjoyed your stay. I always look forward to your feedback so please don’t hesitate to get in touch for any reason whatsoever – I will reply as swiftly as possible.

See you next time,

Eat Well,

Sebbyholmes

Smooth Stir-Fried Chicken, Chilli jam and Green Mango Hot/Cold Salad

Smooth Stir-Fried Chicken, Chilli jam and Green Mango Hot/Cold SaladSo far, a few of my recipes have been inspired by my time at the begging bowl, as I have just reached the end of a seventy hour week in the kitchen, this week is no exception.

Despite being worked like a dog I remained loyal to Articuleat and squeezed in a cheeky recipe at work. This is quite an intricate dish to pull off but well worth the effort. I have always liked the idea of a hot and cold stir-fried salad, so I created this dish with a little inspiration from this thought.

In Thailand there are two types of chilli jam that are commonly eaten; grilled or deep-fried. For this dish I have chosen the latter, as it works as a rich base for this amazing salad.

Deep-fried chilli jam is an amazing product, it can be let down with stock or coconut cream to create rich salad dressings, glazes and sauces – however, it is not the easiest thing to make. It involves a lengthy, yet simple process of slicing, frying, drying and then combining with palm sugar, tamarind and fish sauce. To get the best results you need to cook the deep-fries individually as each vegetable cooks at a different rate.

The key to making an excellent deep-fried chilli jam comes in the consistency of the deep-fried ingredients. Every ingredient needs to be sliced wafer thin in order for them to cook at an even rate. A light golden crisp on the garlic, shallots, ginger, chillies and prawns comes together to create a rich, smoky, spicy base for the chilli jam. It is incredibly important to have a sharp knife in order to slice these ingredients thin enough. Slicing and cooking deep fries is a difficult game to get right as each stage takes a long time. Bear in mind that it can also go epically wrong at any moment if the oil gets too hot. – The last thing that you want is to burn your deep-fries (or fry your hands).

Although it takes a little effort to get the chilli jam made, you will certainly be pleased to have it in the kitchen. The palm sugar and oil act as a preservative, giving the jam a longer shelf life.

Many of the strange ingredients that are included in this recipe can be sourced from oriental supermarkets. The majority can also be found in most large supermarkets. Here at Articuleat I like to keep you on your toes, trust me once you have tried this dish you will run a marathon to have it on your plate again.

Anyway that’s enough from me for today and I hope you enjoy the recipe.

(Serves 2, takes 1 ½ hours, with plenty of spare jam)

Ingredients

(For the chilli jam)

-200g banana shallots, peeled and thinly sliced

-200g garlic cloves, peeled and thinly sliced

-1 knob of ginger, peeled and julienned

-100g dried long red chillies

-50g, dried prawns

-2 tspn gapi paste (fermented shrimp paste), roasted in tin foil on low heat until smelly

-60g palm sugar, roughly chopped

-100ml fish sauce

-100ml tamarind water (buy in packs and soak yourself)

-1 litre cooking oil

(For the stir-fry salad)

-2 chicken breasts, roughly chopped

-40g green beans, topped & tailed, halfed

-40g basil, washed and picked

-40g green mango, peeled and julienned

-40g ong choi (morning glory), roughly chopped

-2 pinch deep-fried garlic

-2 pinch deep-fried shallot

-20g coriander, washed and picked

-200ml chicken stock

-1 fresh long red chilli, thinly sliced into chilli’os

-1 pinch caster sugar

-1 pinch ground white peppercorns

Method

  1. Begin by deep-frying your chilli jam ingredients. Begin with the shallots as these have the highest moister content and therefore take the longest to complete. To do this, heat the oil to a high heat in a large wok (to test that the oil is hot enough for frying drop a few shallots into the oil – if they float and bubble it is ready). Using a fork stir the shallots in the oil making sure they cook evenly. When they are golden brown remove from the hot oil and drain on kitchen paper. To ensure no deep-fries are stuck together, pick them apart using two forks. Repeat this process with the garlic, ginger, dried prawns and the dried red chillies (bare in mind that the red chillies and prawns take less time as they have a low moister content).
  2. Once all the deep-fries are cooked take a pinch of crispy garlic and shallots and put them to one side for a garnish later. Using a food processor combine all the deep-fried ingredients with half the oil that was used for cooking (be sure to let the oil cool before using). Once combined place on a low heat and add the palm sugar and fish sauce. Keep stirring until the sugar caramelises, causing the jam to thicken and clump together. Lastly remove and add the tamarind water – the mixture should be sweet, salty, sour and hot, the magic is in the balance.
  3. Now that the chilli jam is made its time for the easy bit, making the stir-fry. In a hot wok heat a little of the excess oil from deep-frying (this can be kept as fragrant oil to cook with in the future). Throw in the chicken and wok until browned and hot throughout. Next throw in the green beans and morning glory and toss in the juices, then add the chicken stock. Once hot, add a heaped tablespoon of the fried chilli jam and toss – once combined, this will create a thick, flavoursome sauce that coats the stir-fry. Finish by adding the caster sugar and white pepper, then remove from the heat.
  4. Now for the cold ingredients. Toss through the basil, coriander and fresh red chilli and place on a plate. Finally garnish with the green mango, a little deep-fried shallot and garlic, then enjoy.

Smooth Stir-Fried Chicken, Chilli jam and Green Mango Hot/Cold SaladThanks very much for stopping by at Articuleat and I hope you have enjoyed your stay. I always look forward to your feedback so please don’t hesitate to get in touch for any reason whatsoever – I will reply as swiftly as possible.

See you next time,

Eat Well,

Sebbyholmes

Chilli & Lime Salmon, Sour Fruit & herb Salad topped with Soy Tempura battered Watercress

Chilli & Lime Salmon, Sour Fruit & herb Salad topped with Soy Tempura battered Watercress This fresh, zingy salad is a perfect dish to compliment the sun (if you are lucky enough to find yourself near any? Britain it seems, is not far off hosting a double – winter this year). By coating the watercress in a soy tempura batter and shallow frying in olive oil it adds a crispy texture to this great dish. The salad demonstrates a delicious balance of flavour and texture – a must try for any food lover.

The strong flavour of the dressing also compliments rice if you are looking to bulk the meal out a little. Try accompanied with some steamed Jasmine rice for more of a fill.

(Serves 2, takes 15 – 20 minutes)

Ingredients

(For salad)

-Watercress (this dish was designed for the watercress recipe club competition –take a look)

-25g picked mint leaves.

-100g sweet corn.

-25g picked curly leaf parsley.

-1/2 red onion, peeled and thinly sliced.

-1 green mango, stone out, peeled, chiffonaded.

-1 mandarin (clementine will do), peeled and split into segments.

-2 fillets (roughly 400g) Salmon, Skinned but keep skin for garnish, chopped into 2x2cm chunks.

2 tbs fish sauce (to marinate the salmon skin).

-1 liter olive oil (for shallow frying).

(For tempura batter)

-1 egg.

– 100g plain flour, sifted.

-30g tapioca flour (rice flour or corn flour will do).

-240ml icy cold water.

-1 tablespoon soy sauce.

(For dressing)

-5 large red chillies, de-seeded & thinly sliced.

-2 limes, juiced.

-2 mandarins, juiced.

-2 tbs fish sauce.

-1 small pinch salt .

-3 pinches caster sugar.

Chilli & Lime Salmon, Sour Fruit & herb Salad topped with Soy Tempura battered Watercress

Method

  1. Firstly make the tempura watercress;

Beat the egg and add the cold water, beating until the mixture is light then add the soy. Mix the flour and the tapioca flour together then sift the flours into the egg mixture. Stir it all together but do not over mix.

Next place the oil in a deep wok or pan on a high heat. Individually dip the watercress into the batter and fry for 3 to 5 minutes until golden brown (or they will stick together, turn the pieces once as they fry. When ready remove from hot oil using tongs and drain on paper towels.

2.Next cook the salmon;

Firstly soak the salmon skin in fish sauce then drop into the hot oil and fry for around 30 seconds, remove using tongs and drain on towels. Lastly carefully drop the salmon chunks into the hot oil and fry for 2-3 minutes, until they are golden brown on the outside and moist inside. When ready remove and drain on paper towels.

Chilli & Lime Salmon, Sour Fruit & herb Salad topped with Soy Tempura battered Watercress

3. Now for the tricky bit – the dressing;

Using a pestle and mortar, pound the sliced chillies with a small pinch of salt into a smooth paste (the salt acts as an abrasive, it is not for flavour). Next add the sugar and continue to pestle until combined to a smooth paste. Once achieved add the lime juice, mandarin juice and the fish sauce (the key to this dressing is in the balance. You may need to adjust these measurements slightly as strength and size of ingredients vary).

The dressing should be sweet (from the sugar and mandarin juice), salty (from the fish sauce), sour (from the lime juice) and a little hot from the chillies. The consistency should be thick enough to cling to the salad when coated.

4. Lastly, assemble the salad;

In a mixing bowl place the watercress, mint leaves, curly leaf parsley, red onion, sweet corn, green mango and mandarin segments. Place a fillet’s worth of salmon chunks into the bowl with this then poor a very generous amount of the dressing over the top. To complete, delicately fold the dressing into the ingredients making sure to not leave anything untouched, be sure to keep the salmon chunks in one piece.

5. All ready to plate up;

Carefully place a portion of the salmon salad in the center of a plate. Drizzle the excess dressing around the edge of the salad to emphasize that it is oozing with the fresh, flavorful dressing (make sure not to hide the salmon within the salad, show it off). Top with some large pieces of the tempura battered watercress and some of the crispy salmon skin.

Chilli & Lime Salmon, Sour Fruit & herb Salad topped with Soy Tempura battered Watercress

Thanks very much for stopping by at Articuleat and I hope you have enjoyed your stay. I always look forward to your feedback so please don’t hesitate to get in touch for any reason whatsoever – I will reply as swiftly as possible.

Also if you enjoy this recipe it has been entered into the ‘Watercress’ recipe club competition. I would really appreciate if you had a look and gave it a like or a comment.

See you next time,

Eat Well,

Sebbyholmes