Green Curry of Mussels, Monkfish, Wild Ginger, Asian Vegetables and Sweet Basil with Vermicelli Noodles

 

#thaifood #greencurry #londonrestaurants #sebbyholmes

Photo taken by Yavez Anthonio

The last year has been absolutely mental, Farang has gone from having one street food stand in a market in Brook Green (which is literally at the point where I wrote my last Articuleat post) to having a range of street food stands across London, to now having a restaurant in Highbury and a book, ‘Cook Thai’ that has just been released across the country. The time has finally come for Articuleat to begin again, this blog is for all the bits and bobs that are worth a mention, my little corner of the internet for recipes banter and bullshit- welcome to it.

Ingredients (Serves 2-3 / GF)

For the curry

2kg, large mussels, washed, beards and barnacles removed

200g, monkfish, skinned and sliced into 2cm thick chunks

150g, thin rice vermicelli noodles, blanched for 1 minute in boiling salt water and then refreshed under cold running water

20g, baby corn, sliced into thin roll-cuts

20g, white daikon, peeled and sliced into thin roll-cuts and braised in water until softened (about 5 minutes)

3, long red chillies, sliced into roll cuts

3, long green chillies, sliced into roll cuts

10g, green beans, topped and tailed, cut into 2cm long chunks

150g, green curry paste

200ml, fish stock

150ml, coconut oil (crack)

300ml, coconut cream

1 tablespoon wild ginger, grachai, peeled and thinly sliced (regular ginger will work fine)

20g, Thai basil, washed and picked

10g, coriander, washed and picked

2 tablespoons, fish sauce

1 teaspoon palm sugar

1 lime, chopped into cheeks for garnish

½ teaspoon sea salt

For the curry paste (makes around 1kg of paste)

150g, fresh birds eye chillies, stems removed, roasted over a barbecue or in an oven for around 10 minutes until softened and a little smoky

150g, fresh long green chillies, stems and seeds removed, thinly sliced, roasted over a barbecue or in an oven for around 10 minutes until softened and a little smoky

250g, banana shallots, peeled, roughly chopped (use Thai shallots if possible)

250g, peeled garlic

100g, peeled lemongrass, topped and tailed, outside shell removed, sliced into small chunks

30g, galingale, peeled and cut into small chunks

20g, coriander roots, cleaned and finely sliced

30g, fresh red turmeric, peeled (watch the hands, this stuff stains)

20g wild ginger, krachai, peeled and roughly chopped

1 tablespoon, roasted gapi paste, fermented shrimp paste (leave this out if vegetarian)

1 tablespoon, whole white peppercorns, lightly toasted in dry pan

3 teaspoons, whole coriander seeds, lightly toasted in dry pan

2 teaspoons, cumin seeds, lightly toasted in dry pan

2 pieces, roughly 2g, mace, lightly roasted in pan

1-2 teaspoons coarse sea salt

Method

Firstly make the curry paste. Using a pestle and mortar individually pound up all the fresh ingredients separately until they are combined into one complete paste. For example, start with the lemongrass, as it is tough, chop it into small chunks to make it easier on yourself then pound using a pestle and mortar until all is mixed into one paste. Next pound the galangal, as it is also tough, using the same process, then the chillies, garlic etc. Once all are pounded individually, combine them in the pestle until they are all together as one paste.

Meanwhile toast the spices in a pan. However, bear in mind that these all toast at different rates so start with the coriander seeds, moving constantly, as soon as they start to smoke a little add the mace and cumin. Keep moving these for one more minute and then add the whole white peppercorns and remove from the heat. The heat from the hot spices is enough to toast the white peppercorns, if they remain on the heat they will pop and explode. Once toasted, spice-grind these spices to a fine powder and pound them into your curry paste. Keep pestle and mortaring away until you are left with a slightly moist, slightly coarse paste, with no identifiable chunks of any ingredients, everything should be equally pounded into a paste with no lumps.

Store the paste in an air tight container with cling film acting as a barrier against oxidisation. In a fridge, the paste will last for 2-3 weeks. It will slowly lose flavour over time, the paste turning brown in colour is an obvious sign of oxidisation which will change the flavour. 

Next, heat the coconut oil in a wok, when bubbling, add 200g green curry paste and keep stirring and scraping regularly until paste begins to split like scrambled eggs and darkens slightly. You will also notice that the smell of the ingredients changes from raw, to a fragrant, as all the ingredients cook together as one. At this point add the palm sugar and allow to cook into the paste for one minute until the paste darkens slightly as the sugar caramelises.

Now it’s time to let the curry out. Add all the fish stock and half of the coconut cream, the daikon, green beans and baby corn. Stir to combine and then cover and bring to a simmer, cook out for around five minutes until all vegetables are cooked.

Next drop in the monkfish tails and the mussels and put the lid back on to simmer for a further 3-4 minutes until the monkfish is cooked through and the mussels have all opened, discard any that remain closed. At this point the curry would have thickened a little, so finish off the remaining coconut cream and the fish sauce. Lastly, add Thai basil, green and red chilli roll-cuts, fish sauce to taste and wild ginger, fold these ingredients in carefully as you don’t want to destroy the fish, then serve immediately.

Serve the curry in a bowls, place portions of the cooked noodles in the bowls and then serve the loose curry over the top of the noodles. The curry should be thick enough to coat the noodles, rich, creamy, salty, spicy and fishy, the magic is in the balance.

Thanks for stopping by at Articuleat and I hope that you have enjoyed your stay. I always look forward to your feedback so please don’t hesitate to get in touch for any reason whatsoever – I will reply as swiftly as possible.

See you next time,

Eat well,

Seb

#greencurry #thaifood #londonfood #farang

Photo taken by Yavez Anthonio

 

 

 

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Have a happy fudging Christmas: fudge, three ways

Fudge BoardWell shit, once again it’s that time of year where I manage to ignore my girlfriend and family’s requests to go shopping, to the point where I only have a couple of days to do the Christmas shopping. Unfortunately, life as a chef and food blogger is not most accommodating for catching up on your Christmas shopping. Every time I have found a moment to myself, quite literally the last thing I even want to think about is Christmas shopping. For example, today (being my first day off for Christmas) would have been ideal to head off out into the rain, probably to Oxford Street and get everyone presents. However, despite the fact that even the thought of a busy shopping spree upsets me, something inside me urged me to make fudge and then write about it? Why not?

So, this year I thought “screw it” I’m going to take a stand! For all those out there in the same situation I urge you to come forward and join, I’m just making some snazzy fudge. After all, it’s the thought that counts right?

Now I can appreciate that making fudge for a present is a bit of a cop out. However, surely the same can’t be said for making three different types of fudge? Well, that’s my logic anyway. So after careful consideration (363 days to be precise) I have concluded that fudge it is. If anyone is in the same position this close to Christmas then we must lead similar lifestyles. If you’re stuck for ideas, or the most expensive flowers in the service station just won’t do this year then no fear, ‘Articuleat’ is here to save the day.

It’s quite ironic that a product accidently created in Virginia; USA, by a toffee maker’s apprentice is now going to be the saviour of my Christmas. Allegedly a toffee demonstration went wrong and it was taken off at the wrong temperature, this is also apparently where the term “to fudge something up” came from. Anyway things have come a long way since then and this fudge is purposeful.

Right then! Back to the recipe, as I said earlier we are making three different types of fudge, the first being dark chocolate and fresh orange. If you are a regular reader of ‘Articuleat’, then you already know that I like to make things from scratch, this trio of fudge certainly doesn’t break this trend. In order to get a potent orange taste to infuse into my fudge, I squeezed the juice from four oranges, then reduced it into a 100ml, concentrated juice. This was then added to my fudge along with some orange zest, the result – deliciousness.

The second fudge is white chocolate, spearmint and hazelnut. For this I had to work out the best way to infuse the spearmint into my fudge. In the end I decided to make a clear sugar syrup using caster sugar and water, when this was hot I added mint in order to capture the spearmint flavour within the syrup. Finished off with some fine julienne mint leaves and toasted hazelnuts and we’re done.

The third and final fudge is milk chocolate, raisin and toasted walnut. This is the simplest of the trio however if you have ever made fudge before you may know that white chocolate does not set as firm as others when used in fudge. Due to this I had to increase the white chocolate content to ensure that it would set correctly, I’m sure that no one will have an issue with extra chocolate?

Ingredients

(For the dark chocolate orange fudge)

-500g, caster sugar

-150g, dark chocolate, broken into small chunks (make sure it has at least a 70% cocoa solids content)

-500ml, double cram

-75g, liquid glucose

-Four oranges, keep the zest of 2 and the juice of all four

(For the white chocolate, spearmint and hazelnut fudge)

-500g, caster sugar

-350g, white chocolate, broken into small chunks

-500ml, double cream

-75g, liquid glucose

-80g fresh spearmint, 20g fine julienned, the rest for the sugar syrup

-75g, hazelnuts, toasted and skin removed

(For the milk chocolate, raisin and walnut fudge)

-500g, caster sugar

-150g, milk chocolate

-75g, liquid glucose

-75g, raisins, soaked for a few minutes in boiling water then drained thoroughly

-75g, walnuts, toasted

Method (each recipe makes around 800g of fudge)

(For the dark chocolate orange fudge)

  1. Firstly bring the orange juice to the boil and simmer until you have 100ml left in the pan. This will leave you with a concentrated orange juice, which is perfect; we want the flavour, not the liquid. Take the orange zest and blanch it in boiling water 3 times, this takes the bitterness out of the zest and makes it nice to eat.
  2.  Combine the sugar, double cream and glucose in a pan then bring to the boil on a medium heat. Be sure to stir regularly to ensure that the ingredients are mixed and not sticking to the pan. Once melted and combined, boil until the mixture reaches 118 degrees centigrade, this is the temperature that sugar needs to be at to set into fudge, no more, no less.
  3.  Lastly remove from the heat and immediately mix in the dark chocolate, the concentrated orange juice and the zest (the heat from the sugar will melt the chocolate). Pour this mixture into a tray that is lined with cling film and parchment paper then set in the fridge, should take around an hour.

(For the white chocolate, spearmint and hazelnut fudge)

  1. Firstly take 50g of sugar and melt it in a pan with 100ml of water until combined. Once hot add the 80g of fresh spearmint and simmer for a few minutes. Next remove from the heat and food process the mixture in order to extract as much mint flavour as possible, next pass through a sieve to remove the mint but keep the liquid.
  2. Combine the mint sugar syrup with the rest of the sugar; double cream and glucose in a pan then bring to the boil on a medium heat. Be sure to stir regularly to ensure that the ingredients are mixed and not sticking to the pan. Once melted and combined, boil until the mixture reaches 118 degrees centigrade, this is the temperature that sugar needs to be at to set into fudge, no more, no less.
  3. Lastly remove from the heat and immediately mix in the white chocolate, toasted hazelnuts and the julienned mint leaves. Pour this mixture into a tray that is lined with cling film and parchment paper then set in the fridge, should take around an hour.

(For the milk chocolate, raisin and walnut fudge)

  1. Combine the sugar, double cream and glucose in a pan then bring to the boil on a medium heat. Be sure to stir regularly to ensure that the ingredients are mixed and not sticking to the pan. Once melted and combined, boil until the mixture reaches 118 degrees centigrade, this is the temperature that sugar needs to be at to set into fudge, no more, no less.
  2. Remove from the heat and immediately add the milk chocolate, softened raisins and the toasted walnuts. Pour this mixture into a tray that is lined with cling film and parchment paper then set in the fridge, should take around an hour.

So there you have it, a trio of Christmas fudge. I hope that you all enjoy this recipe and if necessary, use it to sort a few people out with Christmas presents. I now have to hope that none of my family will read this blog post until after Christmas; otherwise I will probably have to make something else.

Fudge BoardThanks very much for stopping by at Articuleat and I hope you have enjoyed your stay. I always look forward to your feedback so please don’t hesitate to get in touch for any reason whatsoever – I will reply as swiftly as possible.

From ‘Articuleat’ have a very happy Christmas and a great new year,

See you next time,

Eat Well,

Sebby Holmes